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My Erasmus Experience – Post #5 – The People of Spain

It’s not often I say this, but I absolutely adore this photo. There’s just something about it. The woman in the dress pulling an awkward face, the fact that the man’s head in the suit is half covered by the baby, the fact the baby has spotted something off-camera? I think it’s the feeling that it’s not quite 100%. It’s an image that came about almost by accident. I was taking a shot of the people across the street, when they (seemingly a wedding party) emerged from around the corner. I had only a split second to frame the image, focus and snap. Thankfully the settings were near perfect and I managed to capture one of my favourite photos I’ve taken so far in my photography life.

Now that I’m comfortable in Madrid, one of the most entertaining things to do is people watch. The culture out here is so vastly different from back in Coventry, but also incredibly similar in some areas. You still get the classic stereotypes within the crowd, but the people just seem much more entertaining and care-free than in any other city I have been to. For a country that isn’t used to saying please and thank-you after every phrase, it’s a nice surprise to find that the majority of people are welcoming. Behind this image is the end of the Royal Palace of Madrid, which is regularly swamped with tourists from every country imaginable. It’s the Buckingham Palace of Madrid, if that helps you imagine. The proximity of the palace to the bar we were sitting in would suggest that it was a busy place to be. Not at all. Madrid is full of these quiet little havens of beer and free tapas. (I should explain, there’s a law in Spain unwritten or not, that means if you order alcohol you get free tapas either in the form of a bowl of olives, crisps, bread and meat or something similar). We sat out in the sun after a long day of filming a music video for the Coventry band Flygone, and watched the world go by.

Back to the people of Spain. The only issue I have had so far are the street vendors and the Policia. The street vendors seem to pop-up out of nowhere, and have refined the art of running away quickly when the police arrive. They could be selling anything, from legit-fake Ray Ban sunglasses to designer handbags and other items of expensive clothing. All fake of course, but not that that’s stopped me from spending a fiver on a pair of sunglasses at 6 in the morning on the walk home from a club. It feels like there are a fair few of these unsavoury characters, especially as it’s the capital city, but the police seem to have everything under control and the tourists can mince on by without any worries at all. In contrast, I recently took a trip to Paris for Pitchfork Festival, and on one of our first trips on the metro my friend nearly lost his wallet to a pickpocket. We were in France for less than a day.

The Policia here are incredibly intimidating. Being a big group of students who like to make inconceivable amounts of noise at 3am in a residential area, we’ve had a few run ins with the local authorities. There is a strict noise curfew here, which means that if you make any loud noise after 11pm, the neighbours have the right to call the cops who’ll turn up at your door, armed to the teeth with pistols threatening you with a €300 fine. Me and a friend were once chatting on a street corner after a few drinks at a local bar in Villaviciosa, when the Civil Guard came out of nowhere, hopped out of their 4×4 and demanded that we empty our pockets onto the nearby wall. Safe to say the event with humorous to us, as we weren’t drug dealers, but if you were you would’ve been in for a rough night.

Obviously the police are there to keep the neighbourhood under control, with it being rumoured that our local area is the Breaking Bad of Spain. However, the general public are some of the friendliest people you could ever meet, and it has definitely opened my eyes to the contrast that the UK has to other countries in Europe. We just need to lighten up!

The title of the featured image is ‘Wedding Party, Royal Palace of Madrid’.

My Erasmus Experience – Post #4 – Recession? What Recession?

Before I came here, I had heard a lot of stories in the media about how bad the economy of Spain was, particularly the housing market. The housing market collapse that brought about the recession in 2008 hit Spain especially hard, as their economy had been based on a housing bubble since the 1950’s. Since then Spain has been struggling with debt, along with almost all of the countries in Europe and the euro zone. When we first arrived, the extent of the damage was very difficult to see. In recent years Spain has enjoyed a revival of its economy especially in the Madrid region, which was one of the few areas of Spain on top of its debt problems. The tourism industry was still alive and probably one of the biggest earners in this part of the world, in terms of a steady income.

Villaviciosa de Odon, where our house is situated, is more or less the same. However one of the biggest indicators that everything was once not ok is situated a few minutes walk from our house. An abandoned building that could be anything from a hospital to an office complex, was clearly left before construction was finished, and has left it an empty shell on the horizon. Now covered in several hundred layers of spray paint, it’s a mecca for artists of all kinds. A group of us went to visit, which involved a 70-odd metre crouch/crawl/walk through a series of drainage tunnels beneath a motorway. With no fences of security of any kind to stop us, we exited the tunnel and were greeted with a view of the building in all its glory. The areas of the brickwork that weren’t covered in graffiti were a bright orange-brown coloured, and flanked in various places by tall grey support columns holding up a thin concrete roof. Three or four floors were visible from the outside, including what looked like an underground parking complex and a roof-top terrace.

We entered the building in the basement area, through an area that was possibly intended to be a huge garage door, possibly for working vehicles of some kind. A quick walk through the dark corridors eventually led to a staircase next to an open elevator shaft. The evidence of previous explorers was obvious, with a huge pile of broken rubble and metal covering the floor of the shaft, having been dropped from many floors above. We ventured up the stairs, still amazed at everything we could see. Graffiti, pitch black corridors and vandalism. This place has it all. We began to hear voices coming from within the building, and after a few minutes of panic we met a Spanish photographer doing a photo-shoot of a model on the rooftop. We greeted him and he asked us to stay out of his way, so we did. The views from the roof were spectacular, and we all agreed it would make a perfect set for a film. The landscape was like nothing I’d seen before. Desert and grassland littered with piles of bricks and concrete slabs, stretching towards a row of pine trees in the distance. The sun began to set, and after getting a hand-full of golden hour photos, we left back through the tunnel and went home. I’ll definitely be visiting there again.

I took an endless amount of photographs, which I regretted when we returned, as I’m still going through them now, but one of my favourites is the featured image I’ve used. Titled: “The Great Recession”.