Before I came here, I had heard a lot of stories in the media about how bad the economy of Spain was, particularly the housing market. The housing market collapse that brought about the recession in 2008 hit Spain especially hard, as their economy had been based on a housing bubble since the 1950’s. Since then Spain has been struggling with debt, along with almost all of the countries in Europe and the euro zone. When we first arrived, the extent of the damage was very difficult to see. In recent years Spain has enjoyed a revival of its economy especially in the Madrid region, which was one of the few areas of Spain on top of its debt problems. The tourism industry was still alive and probably one of the biggest earners in this part of the world, in terms of a steady income.

Villaviciosa de Odon, where our house is situated, is more or less the same. However one of the biggest indicators that everything was once not ok is situated a few minutes walk from our house. An abandoned building that could be anything from a hospital to an office complex, was clearly left before construction was finished, and has left it an empty shell on the horizon. Now covered in several hundred layers of spray paint, it’s a mecca for artists of all kinds. A group of us went to visit, which involved a 70-odd metre crouch/crawl/walk through a series of drainage tunnels beneath a motorway. With no fences of security of any kind to stop us, we exited the tunnel and were greeted with a view of the building in all its glory. The areas of the brickwork that weren’t covered in graffiti were a bright orange-brown coloured, and flanked in various places by tall grey support columns holding up a thin concrete roof. Three or four floors were visible from the outside, including what looked like an underground parking complex and a roof-top terrace.

We entered the building in the basement area, through an area that was possibly intended to be a huge garage door, possibly for working vehicles of some kind. A quick walk through the dark corridors eventually led to a staircase next to an open elevator shaft. The evidence of previous explorers was obvious, with a huge pile of broken rubble and metal covering the floor of the shaft, having been dropped from many floors above. We ventured up the stairs, still amazed at everything we could see. Graffiti, pitch black corridors and vandalism. This place has it all. We began to hear voices coming from within the building, and after a few minutes of panic we met a Spanish photographer doing a photo-shoot of a model on the rooftop. We greeted him and he asked us to stay out of his way, so we did. The views from the roof were spectacular, and we all agreed it would make a perfect set for a film. The landscape was like nothing I’d seen before. Desert and grassland littered with piles of bricks and concrete slabs, stretching towards a row of pine trees in the distance. The sun began to set, and after getting a hand-full of golden hour photos, we left back through the tunnel and went home. I’ll definitely be visiting there again.

I took an endless amount of photographs, which I regretted when we returned, as I’m still going through them now, but one of my favourites is the featured image I’ve used. Titled: “The Great Recession”.

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